scottish bloggers

The Scottish Independence Podcast 131 – Sharon Dolan-Powers

For the 131st episode of The Scottish Independence Podcast, I spoke with Sharon Dolan-Powers, who I suspect most of you will know by another namejpI97RIk, or indeed by one of her projects.

Sharon is not a native Scot, but came to the country and got involved in politics on the Yes side of the Indy debate.

We talked about those decisions and her reasons for them. We also discussed disability issues in the UK and Scotland as, due to family circumstances and her work, she has a good knowledge of the subject. Furthermore, as someone not from Scotland originally, she provides an interesting perspective on the Scottish cringe. Finally, and at the risk of giving away where she comes from, we had a wee natter about Trump.

It was good to learn something about the Isle of Seil too.

You can download here if you right click THIS LINK and “save as”

You can listen to the show online or you can subscribe with itunes. We can alse be found on youtube and on facebook too.

These podcasts are independently minded and independently funded, you can help to keep them going by making a donation.

The Scottish Independence Podcast 124 – Simone Charlesworth

For the 124th episode of The Scottish Independence Podcast on Monday past I spoke with Simone Charlesworth. Simone blogs at Mewsing Out Loud and you-YYD_HmV.jpg large can find her on twitter here.

We talked about her experience coming up from England to Scotland and trying to get up to speed with Scottish politics as quickly as possible. After she got up to speed, she got involved in things on the Yes side.

Simone also talked about how working with Labour councils down south may or may not differ greatly from those you find in Scotland.

She has a very enlightening point (actually a few) about why she feels the exact opposite of the cringe.

How would someone who takes an interest in politics describe the differences between the media in England and that in Scotland?

Finally, Simone also had a brilliant line about Jim Murphy, and I managed to sneak in two lines from comedy shows. Bonus points to any listener who catches them..

Hope you enjoy…

You can download here if you right click THIS LINK and “save as”

You can listen to the show online at its web page or you can subscribe with itunes. We can alse be found on youtube and on facebook too.

These podcasts are independently minded and independently funded, you can help to keep them going by making a donation.

 

 

Selected Election Quotes

The old suggestion that if you put a monkey in a red rosette in Scotland it would win appears not to be true anymore.

Here  is just a little group of some of the more interesting tweets and quotes from an amazing night.

Just woken up to what looks like an SNP landslide. My congrats to all the bright young things there. For me, independence game now on.  – Pat Kane on twitter

Glasgow, politically, is going to change beyond all recognition Alistair Braidwood on twitter

McLetchie has arrived at ex msp rehab. Lording it up champagne in pocket.Said to Tom and Andy “we’re still in charge ya wee Miliband Ye” Ex MSP Rosie Kane on Twitter 

That Liberals were prepared in Scotland to spend years in coalition with war criminals, but would not enter a coalition with the SNP because of opposition to letting people have a referendum on independence, was so stupid and illiberal, that bluntly the Scottish Lib Dems deserved their virtual annihilation. Craig Murray

So there’s the answer tae the Megrahi question right there. Kenny Macaskill wins, an wins big. Sophia Pangloss on Twitter

Can we just skip to the end and declare independence now, please? Kirsty Yarr on Twitter

SCOTLAND SUNDAY PHOTOS 3 – GLASGOW OLD COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

By commercial district I do not mean the merchant city. That is another post.

The area with all these kinds of buildings is actually much bigger than these photos suggest. These are just a couple.

This is a different part of the city and you can see that at a certain time some serious money went into these..

IT’S WILLIAM MacGILLIVRAY’S BIRTHDAY TOO

Whilst there are people all around the world celebrating Burns Night, it is worth mentioning that today is the birthday of another Scot of note.

William MacGillivray was the illegitimate son of a soldier. He was brought up by his uncle in Harris and said “the solitude of Nature was my school”.

He was enrolled in Aberdeen university at only the age of 12 and used to walk home to Harris every summer. Furthermore, he wished to see the natural history collections in the British Museum and walked all the way to London to see them. He said of the trip…

‘I felt my love of natural history very much increased by the inspection of the museum. At the same time I felt convinced that to study Nature I must have recourse to Nature alone, pure and free from human interference. . . I am afraid that my vanity will be too much increased by this visit.’

This trip may have informed much of his later work as the Natural History museum in London state on their site that one of the reasons that he is not more famous may be because

Although adored by his students, MacGillivray did not endear himself to everybody. With an absolute conviction in his own abilities, he tended to be provocative and outspoken. He often condemned scientists who examined specimens without ever seeing the creature in its natural habitat.

They also quote a letter to a colleague…

‘To those really desirous of information respecting our native species, I would say, let us betake ourselves to the fields and woods; let us traverse the hills and valleys together; let us there study our favourites, pursue them from brake to bush.’

MacGillivray later became the curator at the museum of Natural History in Edinburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons. He later left this post to take up the post of Professor of Natural History at Aberdeen University. During this post he introduced the practice of taking students on field trips and according to one student he

‘he could walk the most active of us into limp helplessness’.In amongst all this he had been writing prodigiously as well as becoming a renowned natural artist.

There is definitely more than one notable Scot with a birthday today.

 

THE GREEN BRIGADE

Here is the article I had published over at Bella Caledonia a little while ago which I never got round to sticking on here.

“The Scottish Cup Final of 1988 was marred when Margaret Thatcher made an inflammatory gesture….she turned up”.
– Only An Excuse

“Maggie Maggie Get tae ****”
– Hampden 1988

“The opinion that art should have nothing to do with politics is itself a political attitude.”
– George Orwell

This applies equally well to sport.

Like a lot of football fans, I have always been very worried about the idea of banning certain chants, even if I find them disgusting or not. In Scotland this is tied up with sectarian issues. Political songs are not banned but fans often try to cast a political song of a group of opposition supporters as sectarian and consequently get it banned. This is often done because genuine offence is caused and often just to wind-up the opposition supporters.

At the moment Scottish football is full of controversies, intrigues and allegations of corruption and lies. I have no doubt some of the allegations are true. One website in particular is promising that there is more scandal to come.  The referee business is going to rumble on and hopefully some big shake-ups will come as a result. You might say we have learned a thing or two from the Godfather of corruption in football which is FIFA itself.  Corruption in football is common throughout the world and one of the myths of our little nation (and not only in terms of football) is that “it doesn’t happen here”. Spain, Germany, Italy and other nations have all recently had problems. Why would such things not be possible in Scotland?

Conversely, one of the good things about all this intrigue in the game is that it all helps to cover up the fact that the football is poor.

But apart from these controversies there is something else going on that is a fairly simple free speech issue. Celtic (the team I support) are trying to ban  the fans who made the display against the poppy being put on the Celtic shirt for the upcoming matches. The group who made the display made a statement of which this is part….

“Earlier this year, the Saville Report on Bloody Sunday confirmed that 14 unarmed civilians were murdered in Derry in 1972 by the Paratroop Regiment. They were among hundreds killed by the British Army during the most recent phase of conflict in Ireland. More recently, the British Armed Forces have murdered and maimed many thousands more innocent civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan. The poppy remembers not just our grandfathers who fought the Nazis but also those who sank the Belgrano and brutally occupied the streets of Belfast and Basra. While we recognise the right of individuals to remember their dead and that many within the Celtic support will wear the poppy in memory of family and friends lost in WW2 and other conflicts, we cannot accept the imposition of the poppy onto our shirts.”

You can read the full statement here.

In the aftermath of it all (incidentally, using the word “aftermath” makes it sound like a disaster of some sort…it was a banner, nothing more) I was quite surprised to see many people on supposedly leftist sites attacking the group and calling them “thugs” and so on. They are not thugs and are in fact known to do work in the community with refugees and so on (no, I am not a member).

Whether you agree with what the banner said or not, and I would like to say that I have no problem with what they wrote, to ban the people who did it is clearly a form of political censorship. This shouldn’t come as a surprise from a club with John Reid as chairman but why is it acceptable to stop such people from airing their views? How could it possibly be acceptable?

By way of illustrating my point I would like to provide another example. Right in the middle of Poll Tax time, Thatcher made an ill-advised visit to present the Scottish Cup trophy to the winners of the 1988 Scottish Cup final.

The match was between Celtic and Dundee Utd and thousands of supporters of both sets of teams had one of these…

Fans of both teams took the opportunity to vent at Thatcher and the song that is the title of this article was probably the most sung on the day along with a couple of other ditties.

Should this display and song have been banned or is it ok just because most people agreed with it? It was actually a great day with a real unity in the crowd… a singleness of purpose if you will – despite the set-up of one team against another that you always have at sporting events.

It was also spoken about in Prime Minister’s question time with Alex Salmond scoring a couple of points off Thatcher a couple of weeks later in Prime Minister’s Questions

Q4. Mr. Salmond

To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 16 June.

The Prime Minister

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the reply that I gave some moments ago.

Mr. Salmond

Is the Prime Minister aware of the findings of last week’s Glasgow Herald opinion poll, which showed that the political effect in Scotland of her visit to the Scottish cup final and her epistle to the Caledonians was to increase Scottish National party support to its highest level for 10 years? Will the Prime Minister demonstrate her extensive knowledge of Scottish affairs by reminding the House of the names of the Moderator of the General Assembly, which she addressed, and the captain of Celtic, to whom she presented the cup?

567

The Prime Minister

I had a very good day in Scotland. Whatever the Hon. Gentleman tries to say, Scotland’s economy and people are benefiting enormously from the way in which the Government are handling them.

Note that last sentence from Thatcher there. I think the people in the Stadium that day were telling her that they weren’t benefitting. Should they have been denied the opportunity to say it?

ESSENTIAL VIEWING

This documentary, from BBC Alba, is essential viewing for anyone from the UK or Ireland but particularly Scottish people. It is also essential viewing for anyone with an interest in politics in general and constitutional issues.

It catalogues the history of obstacles placed in the way of the Scottish Independence movement over the years by the London government . While some of it will be well-known to some of you, a lot of it will be new I suspect.

The first part is here and the links to the next parts are on the continuation page…

(more…)

NOT JUST THE IRISH

It isn’t just the Irish who seem to have positive things to say about their independence.

Here is the table of Independence Days all around the world taken from Wikipedia.

I bet you wouldn’t find many people in any of these countries that think getting their independence was a grave error and that they should hand sovereignty back to whoever it was that was exercising it over them.

Also, take a look below the chart to hear a pretty sweet song from when Jamaica became independent.

Abkhazia 09-30 September 30 Independence from Georgia in 1993. Officially declared as such in 1999.[1] (Not universally recognized.) End of the 1992-1993 War in Abkhazia; also known as liberation day.
Afghanistan 08-19 August 19 Independence from United Kingdom control over Afghan foreign affairs in 1919.
Albania 11-28 November 28 (Dita e Pavarësisë) Declared by Ismail Qemali in 1912 and signalled the end of five centuries of Ottoman rule.
Algeria 07-05 July 5 Independence from France in 1962.
Angola 11-11 November 11 Independence from Portugal in 1975.
Antigua and Barbuda 11-01 November 1 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1981.
Argentina 07-09 July 9 Independence declared from Spain in 1816.
Armenia 09-21 September 21 Independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.
Austria 10-26 October 26 Independence from Allies of World War II in 1955 National Day.
Azerbaijan 10-18 October 18
May 28
Independence from the Russian Empire in 1918.
Independence re-declared from the Soviet Union in 1991
Bahamas 07-10 July 10 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1973.
Bahrain 12-16 December 16 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1971 National Day.
Bangladesh 03-26 March 26 Independence was declared from Pakistan and this led to a nine month war ending on December 16, 1971.
Barbados 11-30 November 30 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1966.
Belarus 07-03 July 3 Liberation of Minsk from German occupation by Soviet troops in 1944.
Belgium 07-21 July 21 Independence from the Netherlands (Belgian revolution). Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld takes the oath as first king of the Belgians in 1831.
Belize 09-21 September 21 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1981. September Celebrations.
Benin 08-01 August 1 Independence from France in 1960.
Bolivia 08-06 August 6 Independence from Spain in 1825.
Bosnia and Herzegovina 03-01 March 1 Independence from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1992.
Botswana 09-30 September 30 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1966.
Brazil 09-07 September 7 (Dia da Independência) Declared Independence from Portugal on that date in 1822.
Brunei 01-01 January 1 Independence from United Kingdom in 1984
Bulgaria 09-22 September 22 Independence from Ottoman Empire in 1908
Burkina Faso 08-05 August 5 Independence from France in 1960
Burundi 07-01 July 1 Independence from Belgium in 1962
Cambodia 11-09 November 9 Independence from France in 1953
Cape Verde 07-05 July 5 Independence from Portugal in 1975.
Central African Republic 08-13 August 13 Independence from France in 1960.
Chad 08-11 August 11 Independence from France in 1960.
Chile 02-12 February 12 Declared Independence from Spain on that date in 1818. Actually, Chileans celebrate the date of the first Government Junta, September 18. This date was not recognized as until 25 April 1844.
Colombia 07-20 July 20 and August 7 Independence from Spain in 1810.
Democratic Republic of the Congo 06-30 June 30 Independence from Belgium in 1960.
Costa Rica 09-15 September 15 Independence from Spain in 1821.
Côte d’Ivoire 08-07 August 7 Independence from France in 1960.
Croatia 10-08 October 8 and June 25 Independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Independence was declared, after a referendum, by the Parliament on June 25 (the date is celebrated as Statehood Day); EU pressured Croatia into a three month moratorium, and on October 8 the ties with SFRJ were formally severed.
Cuba 05-20 May 20 Independence from United States in 1902.
Cyprus 10-01 October 1 Independence from the United Kingdom on August 16, 1960, but Cyprus Independence Day is commonly celebrated on October 1.[2]
Czech Republic 10-28 October 28 and 01-01 January 1 As Czechoslovakia, marking independence from Austria-Hungary on October 28, 1918.As the Czech Republic after the split of Czechoslovakia
Djibouti 06-27 June 27 Independence from France in 1977
Dominica 11-03 November 3 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1978
Dominican Republic 02-27 February 27 Independence from Haiti in 1844, after a 22-year occupation.
East Timor 05-20 May 20 Independence from Portugal in 2002 (recognition, East Timor was invaded by Indonesia from 1975 to 1999, officially it never ceased to be considered as administrated by Portugal).
Ecuador 08-10 August 10 and May 24 Proclaimed independence from Spain on August 10, 1809, but failed with the execution of all the conspirators of the movement on August 2, 1810. Independence finally occurred on May 24, 1822 at the Battle of Pichincha.
El Salvador 09-15 September 15 Independence from Spain in 1821
Eritrea 05-24 May 24 Independence from Ethiopia in 1993.
Estonia 02-24 February 24
August 20
Independence from the Russian Empire in 1918.
Independence re-declared from the Soviet Union in 1991
Fiji 10-10 October 10 Fiji Independence Day Independence from United Kingdom in 1970.
Finland 12-06 December 6 Independence Day of Finland Independence from Russia in 1917.
The Gambia 02-18 February 18 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1965.
Georgia 05-26 May 26April 9 Day of First Republic in 1918.Independence from USSR in 1991.
Ghana 03-06 March 6 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1957.
Greece 03-25 March 25 Declaration of independence from Ottoman Empire in 1821. Start of the Greek War of Independence
Grenada 02-07 February 7 Declaration of independence from United Kingdom in 1974.
Guatemala 09-15 September 15 Independence from Spain in 1821.
Guinea 10-02 October 2 Independence from France in 1958.
Guyana 05-26 May 26 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1966.
Haiti 01-01 January 1 Declaration of Independence from France in 1804.
Honduras 09-15 September 15 Independence from Kingdom of Spain in 1821.
Iceland 06-17 June 17 Independence from Kingdom of Denmark in 1944.
India 08-15 August 15 (also known as Swatantrata Divas among Indians) Independence from the United Kingdom in 1947.
Indonesia 08-17 August 17 Declaration of Independence day (Hari Proklamasi Kemerdekaan R.I.) from the Netherlands in 1945. The Netherlands acknowledged Indonesian independence and sovereignty in 1949.
Iran 02-11 February 11 Iranian Revolution ends Monarchy in 1979.
Ireland 04-24 Easter Monday Proclamation of the Irish Republic commencing the Easter Rising on April 24, 1916. Independence from the United Kingdom.
Israel 05-14 5 Iyar (Yom Ha’atzmaut) Independence from the British Mandate of Palestine which took place on May 14, 1948 (5 Iyar 5708 in the Hebrew calendar). It is actually celebrated on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday nearest to 5 Iyar, so it actually occurs between the 3rd and 6th of Iyar, which may fall between April 15 and May 15 in the Gregorian calendar.
Jamaica 08-06 August 6 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1962.
Jordan 05-25 May 25 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1946.
Kazakhstan 12-16 December 16 Independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.
Kenya 12-12 December 12 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1963.
Korea, North 09-09 September 9 Founding of the DPRK in 1948.
Korea, South 08-15 August 15 (Gwangbokjeol) Independence from Japan in 1945. (Independence from Japan was declared on March 1, 1919, August 15 is the official Liberation Day of Korea.)
Kuwait 06-26 February 25 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1961.
Kyrgyzstan 08-31 August 31 Independence from USSR in 1991.
Latvia 11-18 November 18 and May 4 Independence from Russia on November 18, 1918.
Independence from Soviet Union on May 4, 1990
Lebanon 11-22 November 22 Independence from France in 1943.
Lesotho 10-04 October 4 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1966.
Liberia 07-26 July 26 1847.
Libya 12-24 December 24, 1951 Independence from Italy. However, celebration of this day was abolished after the “revolution” of September 1, 1969.
Lithuania 02-16 February 16 and March 11 Act of Independence of Lithuania: Independence from the Russian and German Empires in February, 1918; Act of the Re-Establishment of the State of Lithuania: independence from the Soviet Union in March, 1990.
Republic of Macedonia 09-08 September 8 (Den na nezavisnosta or Ден на независноста) Independence from Yugoslavia in 1991.
Madagascar 06-26 June 26 Independence from France in 1960.
Malawi 07-06 July 6 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1964.
Malaysia 08-31 August 31 (Hari Merdeka) Independence from the United Kingdom in 1957
Maldives 07-26 July 26 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1965 join[3]
Mali 09-22 September 22 Independence from France in 1960
Malta 09-21 September 21 (Independence Day (Malta)) Independence from the United Kingdom in 1964.
Mauritius 03-12 March 12 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1968.
Mexico 09-16 September 16 (Grito de Dolores) Independence from Spain declared in 1810. Recognized on September 27, 1821
Moldova 08-27 August 27 Independence from the Soviet Union in 1991
Mongolia 11-26 November 26 Independence from China on July 11, 1921
Montenegro 05-21 May 21 Independence from State union with Serbia, in 2006
Morocco 11-18 November 18 Independence from France and Spain in 1956
Mozambique 06-25 June 25 Independence from Portugal in 1975
Myanmar 01-04 January 4 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1948
Namibia 03-21 March 21 Independence from South African mandate in 1990
Netherlands 05-05 May 5 (Bevrijdingsdag) Liberation from Nazi Germany in 1945
Nicaragua 09-15 September 15 Independence from Spain in 1821
Niger 08-03 August 3 Independence from France in 1960
Nigeria 10-01 October 1 Independence from United Kingdom in 1960
Norway 05-17 May 17 (Constitution Day, or “syttende mai”) The signing of the Norwegian Constitution in Eidsvoll, May 17, 1814.
Pakistan 08-14 August 14 (Yaum e Azadi) Independence from the United Kingdom on 27 Ramadan ul Mubarik, August 14, 1947.
Panama 11-3 November 3 Emancipation and Liberation from Spain on November 28th in 1821, but Panama was a part of Colombia. The 1903 separation and independence from Colombia is celebrated as the official national Panamanian independence day on November 3, Separation Day,also known as Independence from Colombia).
Papua New Guinea 09-16 September 16 Independence from Australia of the former Territories of New Guinea, and Papua, in 1975.
Paraguay 05-15 May 15 (Día de Independencia) Independence from Spain in 1811.
Peru 07-28 July 28 Independence from Spain in 1821.
Philippines 06-12 June 12 (Araw ng Kalayaan) The proclamation date of the 1898 Declaration of Independence by Emilio Aguinaldo during the Philippine Revolution is celebrated as Independence Day. The Republic of the Philippines was recognized as an independent nation on July 4, 1946.
Poland 11-11 November 11 (Święto Niepodległości) Restoration of Poland’s independence in 1918 after 123 years of partitions by Austro-Hungary, Prussia, and Russia.
Portugal 12-01 December 1 Restoration of Portugal’s independence (from Spain) in 1640.The country’s original independence (from the Kingdom of León) was recognized on October 5 of 1143. That day is a holiday in Portugal, but for a different reason. (Implantation of the Republic, or Republic Day. Event of 1910.) Note that none of these events are similar to today’s declarations or recognition of independence as these are in fact the recognition of the rule of a king to the land. Portugal existed as a separate entity before 1143 and during the union with Spain between 1580 and 1640.
Qatar 12-18 December 18 The assumption of power of Sheikh Jassem bin Mohamed al-Thani, ancestor of the current ruling family, in 1878.
Russia 06-12 June 12 Supremacy of Russian laws over Soviet ones in the territory of the RSFSR is declared.
Romania 12-01 May 9 Independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1877.
Rwanda 07-01 July 1 Independence from Belgium in 1962.
Saint Kitts and Nevis 09-19 September 19 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1983.
Samoa 06-01 June 1 June 1 .
São Tomé and Príncipe 07-12 July 12 Independence from Portugal in 1975.
Serbia 02-15 February 15 The beginning of the Serbian revolution against Ottoman occupation in 1804.
Seychelles 06-29 June 29 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1976.
Sierra Leone 04-27 April 27 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1961.
Singapore 08-09 August 9 (National Day Parade) Marks exit / separation from Malaysia in 1965.
Solomon Islands 07-07 July 7 Marks exit / independence from United Kingdom in 1978.
Slovakia 07-17 July 17 Declaration of Independence in 1992 (only a remembrance day), de jure independence came on January 1, 1993 after the division of Czechoslovakia (public holiday).
Slovenia 12-26 December 26 and June 25 (Independence and Unity Day) Date of the release of the official results of the independence plebiscite in 1990, confirming secession from Yugoslavia. (Statehood Day) Declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991.
South Africa 12-11 December 11 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1931. Not a public holiday. Union of South Africa formed on May 31, 1910 and Republic of South Africa declared on May 31, 1961
Sri Lanka 02-04 February 4 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1948.
Sudan 01-01 January 1 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1956.
Suriname 11-25 November 25 Independence from the Netherlands in 1975.
Swaziland 09-06 September 6 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1968.
Switzerland 08-01 August 1 (Swiss National Day) Alliance against the Holy Roman Empire in 1291.
Tajikistan 09-09 September 9 Independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.
Tanzania 12-09 December 9 Declaration of independence from United Kingdom in 1961.
Trinidad and Tobago 08-31 August 31 Independence from the United Kingdom in 1962.
Tonga 06-04 June 4 Tonga was never a colony, but late King’s birthday was celebrated on 4 July.
Togo 04-27 April 27 Independence from France in 1960.
Tunisia 03-20 March 20 Declaration of independence from France in 1956.
Turkey 10-29 October 29 Turkey becomes a republic following the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire.
Turkmenistan 10-27 October 27 Declaration of independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.[4]
Ukraine 08-24 August 24 and January 22 (Den’ Nezalezhnosti) Independence from the Soviet Union on August 24, 1991. Unification of Ukraine on January 22, 1919.[5]
United Arab Emirates 12-02 December 2 (National Day) Independence from the United Kingdom in 1971.
United States 07-04 July 4 (Fourth of July) Declaration of Independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1776.
Uruguay 08-25 August 25 (Día de la Independencia) Declaration of independence from Brazil in 1825.
Uzbekistan 09-01 September 1 Independence from USSR in 1991.
Vanuatu 07-30 July 30 Independence from United Kingdom and France in 1980.
Vatican City 02-11 February 11 Lateran Treaty signed with Italy in 1929.
Venezuela 07-05 July 5 Declaration of independence from Spain in 1811.
Vietnam 09-02 September 2 Proclamation of independence from Japan and France in 1945.
Yemen 11-30 November 30 South Yemen Declaration of independence from United Kingdom in 1967.
Zambia 10-24 October 24 Declaration of independence from United Kingdom in 1964.
Zimbabwe 04-18 April 18 Declaration of independence from United Kingdom in 1980.

HOW TO KEEP A DYING UNION INTACT

Great little video here. It hints at best at a deep hypocrisy in the staunch defenders in the union and at worst at a deep schyzophrenia. I have featured some of the other ones on the channel before too.